Internet

Why IT Should Be The Next Focus Of Your Sustainability Efforts

Reducing the environmental impacts from technology systems, devices, and capabilities can help companies reach their emissions goals.

The world is heading toward a more sustainable future and organizations are inspired to be a part of the solution. Many have set net zero and carbon neutral goals, and it’s clear that advancements in technology will help organizations achieve these sustainability goals by improving efficiencies and reducing the processes that create emissions.

But what many organizations do not realize is that these same technology investments and capabilities can also negatively impact the environment. Recent research on sustainable IT from the Capgemini Research Institute found that 57% of companies aren’t aware of their IT carbon footprint — the impact created by their devices, systems, and capabilities. IT is not typically part of the conversation when organizations establish their sustainability plans — only 18% report having a sustainable IT strategy.

Credit: gearstd via Adobe Stock

Credit: gearstd via Adobe Stock

This is a vast area of untapped potential as companies progress along their sustainability journeys. However, progress needs to be made now: Research shows that by 2025, enterprise IT will have an equivalent annual footprint to powering 360 million homes and generating the transportation of 460 million passenger vehicles.

A lack of awareness of this problem, and how to solve it, is keeping organizations from tackling their IT sustainability challenges and reducing their overall footprints. Here are four areas of enterprise IT proving that current investments and practices aren’t sustainable:  

  • Data centers. Data centers are an important part of business operations and infrastructure, even as many organizations shift data storage to the cloud. However, the amount of energy that it takes to keep data centers up and running is enormous — they contribute to 2% of the electricity use of the entire US.
  • Devices. Unlike data centers where the amount of electricity used to power them is the main contributor to an organization’s carbon footprint, for devices, the carbon footprint of producing the devices themselves is nearly equal to, or exceeds, that of their usage. Our research shows that 60% of the overall IT footprint comes from devices like laptops, desktops, and mobile phones.
  • Artificial intelligence. While AI can certainly help reduce emissions, it can also contribute to an organization’s carbon footprint, as AI-based technologies require large amounts of computing power. A study showed that training an AI language processing system produced 1,400 pounds of carbon equivalent emissions — about the amount produced by flying one-person roundtrip between New York and San Francisco. As the use of AI expands, reducing its energy load is central to creating AI that drives sustainability.
  • Data collection. Even for those who do understand that IT is creating a carbon footprint, 49% say the lack of tools, standards, and ratings to evaluate that footprint is creating an enormous challenge, preventing them from collecting data on the consumption of each device, system, and data center.

 » Read More

Leave your vote

Related Articles

Check Also
Close
Back to top button

Log In

Forgot password?

Don't have an account? Register

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.